Tag Archives: Transitions

Why Changing a Child’s Team is a GOOD thing

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Throughout the course of a child’s treatment with any ABA provider, one thing should be a constant: therapist changes happen. Frequently.

And understandably, this tends to be a difficult adjustment for both our kiddos and their families! In order to continuing developing the best team possible, there are occasionally team changes as a result of professional growth and career advancement, however, it’s important to recognize that team changes do not solely occur because staffing dictates; as an ABA provider, our ultimate goal is to ensure that your child receives the absolute best quality treatment, and one element of providing a well-rounded ABA program is therapist change.

Why?

There are a multitude of benefits to changing therapists, however, we’re going to focus on two: generalization of skills and functional relationship building.

Requiring a learner to be able to respond to new therapists is an important, often under-utilized form of teaching generalization. While learning a new skill with a specific therapist is an amazing accomplishment for a child, it is equally important to ensure that skills taught aren’t just generalized across different environments, but across different people as well.  For instance, a child may return a greeting daily to the therapists that have been teaching them this skill for 6 months, but that doesn’t necessarily mean that, if a novel persons says ‘Hi,’ the response they’ve learned with their typical therapist will generalize.

In addition to generalization, building relationships with and responding to novel people regularly will help set up your child for success in the future. In school, work, or other standard day-to-day activities, we are expected to be able to form and cultivate relationships with new people. Whether it’s a new teacher, a new boss, a new neighbor, a new babysitter or family member, being able to and confident in responding to new faces is always beneficial to a child.

In the end, we understand that therapist changes can be a difficult adjustment for everyone involved, but the benefits of regular team changes will only help children to meet their goals.

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Topics in ABA: Experience Trumps Credentials

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Over the past 10 years the number of BCBA’s has grown from approximately 2,500 in 2005, to close to 20,000 in 2015.  This growth is partially due to the increase in availability of certification programs in the field of behavior analysis. Although there is a growing need for behavior analysts, many students have been entering degree programs with little or no experience working in the field of ABA and a limited knowledge of what a behavior analyst actually does.

As professionals who have supervised and taught in certification programs our experience has been that the most successful students are those that have a background in ABA and have had the opportunity to demonstrate those principles in the natural environment (for our sake, with kids with autism). We have unfortunately witnessed unsuccessful students and a common denominator is typically jumping into a certification program without truly understanding the roles and responsibilities of a BCBA.

As a behavior analyst you have the ability to change behavior! We can make a huge difference in the life of a child with autism and their family; this is something that should not be taken lightly. This is why we are dedicated to not hire or promote individuals because of their credentials, but instead due to their experience and proven ability to be effective at what they do.

Chrissy Barosky M.Ed BCBA, & Danielle Pelz, MS BCBA

A quick word on Precision Teaching AKA ‘The Chart’

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Precision teaching & fluency based instruction training…

One topic that I want to expand upon from the clinical priorities list is precision teaching & fluency based instruction training…

We know that in order to make the most meaningful gains with our learners,we need a strong system of measurement in place. Measurement allows us to make decisions about what we are teaching and how we are teaching it. The better the measurement, the better the decisions. The better the decisions, the better the learning. As a team, our primary goal is to maximize the efficiency and effectiveness of our instruction so our children can grow as quickly as possible. Precision Teaching is a method of standardized measurement and visual analysis using “the chart”, and is based on core behavior analytic principles. All locations have received training and are introducing the “chart” into their programs. Over time, we will develop more intense trainings to teach our clinical team how to develop programs and make quick decisions based on data patterns.

Laura Grant

Vice President of Clinical Development

Planning Ahead: Tips for Increasing Your Child’s Success when Dining out in a Restaurant

We know that sometimes as parents it can be very difficult to take a child with autism to a restaurant with you. You might be worried that people may judge you if your child misbehaves. Below are some tips on how to plan ahead before going out to help keep your child successful and your trip enjoyable!

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1.) Find places that are designated as autism friendly; that may not have as many people and are not as brightly lit or as loud.

2.) Keep your child with you at all times, this will make them feel safe knowing that you’re by them.

3.) Set the expectations ahead of time as to where you’re going and what they can or cannot do while you’re there.

4.) Let your child have a say in what you do, you can even show them pictures so they can help decide where you’re going.

5.) Use the bathroom before leaving the house so your child is comfortable.

6.) Bring an item for your child to play with that they enjoy while you wait for your food – this could be an iPad, sensory items, toys or even a snack.

7.) Look at the menu beforehand, make sure there is a food option for your child that they will eat.

8.) Make a reservation or call ahead so you don’t have to wait to be seated upon arrival.

9.) Ask for a seat in a quieter, less crowded section of the restaurant, this can be less over-stimulating for your child.

10.) Don’t be afraid to ask the server for help – if your child needs a lid for their cup, or a snack to come out quickly.

11.) Request the check as soon as your food arrives.  This way, you will not have to wait long after your child is done eating.

12.) When your child behaves desirably reinforce good behavior with a snack or preferred item to play with.  Make good behavior worthwhile so they will want to behave well in the future.

13.) Have your child keep a preferred item with them so they will be less likely to be upset if they cannot have something they want.

Post by Holli Novinger, BCaBA, Manager of our Indianapolis Area Locations

Go and Have Fun!

Summer is an exciting time filled with opportunities for fun and social opportunities. Though this is a fun time, the change in routine, unusual clothes, increased interaction, and new places may be stressful for children with an autism spectrum disorder. Bierman ABA Autism Center has provided some tips that may help ease anxiety and help with enjoyment of summer fun and travel.

Just like any vacation, the key to a great trip with a kid with autism is preparation. Here are some tips for the extra preparation your family may need to enjoy fun in the sun:

    If traveling to a new place, provide children with pictures before hand. If possible, arrange these pictures into a visual schedule. The internet is a great resource for this. While going through the pictures, tell your child what they may do, see, hear, or feel in the new place. Use words or more pictures to tell them what will happen before or after they visit the new place.

   • Sensory practice. Will your trip require sleeping in a different bed or other new sensory experiences? “Practice” these new senses at home before leaving. Switch beds with your child or have your child sleep on the couch. If headed to the beach, have your child play in a local sandbox or dip his feet in a bucket of water at home.

   • Wear new clothing or swimsuits before the trip. Try on any new or unusual clothing at home before the trip. Try them on for the first time while a child participates in one of his favorite activities.

    • Plan to take breaks. Bring some of a child’s favorite items on the trip. Think of a realistic time frame a child can participate in a vacation activity without taking a break. Use the child’s favorite items to motivate the children.

   • Earplugs. You never know what new sound may bother a child with autism. Earplugs can also be used as a “magic” barrier to help children feel safe and protected in a new environment.

    • Practice waiting in lines and other travel routines. Model the experience in your own home. The Transportation Security Association also has videos of all travel procedures available on their website.

   • Prepare an information card to give to guest services, flight attendants, or other personnel associated with your trip. Many travel and hospitality employees have special needs and disability training. This will staff know what extra considerations may help your family be successful. Image