Tag Archives: teams

Why Changing a Child’s Team is a GOOD thing

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Throughout the course of a child’s treatment with any ABA provider, one thing should be a constant: therapist changes happen. Frequently.

And understandably, this tends to be a difficult adjustment for both our kiddos and their families! In order to continuing developing the best team possible, there are occasionally team changes as a result of professional growth and career advancement, however, it’s important to recognize that team changes do not solely occur because staffing dictates; as an ABA provider, our ultimate goal is to ensure that your child receives the absolute best quality treatment, and one element of providing a well-rounded ABA program is therapist change.

Why?

There are a multitude of benefits to changing therapists, however, we’re going to focus on two: generalization of skills and functional relationship building.

Requiring a learner to be able to respond to new therapists is an important, often under-utilized form of teaching generalization. While learning a new skill with a specific therapist is an amazing accomplishment for a child, it is equally important to ensure that skills taught aren’t just generalized across different environments, but across different people as well.  For instance, a child may return a greeting daily to the therapists that have been teaching them this skill for 6 months, but that doesn’t necessarily mean that, if a novel persons says ‘Hi,’ the response they’ve learned with their typical therapist will generalize.

In addition to generalization, building relationships with and responding to novel people regularly will help set up your child for success in the future. In school, work, or other standard day-to-day activities, we are expected to be able to form and cultivate relationships with new people. Whether it’s a new teacher, a new boss, a new neighbor, a new babysitter or family member, being able to and confident in responding to new faces is always beneficial to a child.

In the end, we understand that therapist changes can be a difficult adjustment for everyone involved, but the benefits of regular team changes will only help children to meet their goals.

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Topics in ABA: Experience Trumps Credentials

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Over the past 10 years the number of BCBA’s has grown from approximately 2,500 in 2005, to close to 20,000 in 2015.  This growth is partially due to the increase in availability of certification programs in the field of behavior analysis. Although there is a growing need for behavior analysts, many students have been entering degree programs with little or no experience working in the field of ABA and a limited knowledge of what a behavior analyst actually does.

As professionals who have supervised and taught in certification programs our experience has been that the most successful students are those that have a background in ABA and have had the opportunity to demonstrate those principles in the natural environment (for our sake, with kids with autism). We have unfortunately witnessed unsuccessful students and a common denominator is typically jumping into a certification program without truly understanding the roles and responsibilities of a BCBA.

As a behavior analyst you have the ability to change behavior! We can make a huge difference in the life of a child with autism and their family; this is something that should not be taken lightly. This is why we are dedicated to not hire or promote individuals because of their credentials, but instead due to their experience and proven ability to be effective at what they do.

Chrissy Barosky M.Ed BCBA, & Danielle Pelz, MS BCBA