Tag Archives: Speech Therapy

You say “toMAYto” and I say “toMAHto”

www.johnbragg.com

May is Better Hearing and Speech Month.  Speech and Language Pathologists like to use this month to educate and teach others more about what we do and how to better ourselves as clinicians.  As an SLP, we work with many therapists OT, PT and BCBAs. Many of us use the same vocabulary and many terms can differ. As an SLP working in a team with BCBAs it is vital to know what we are all talking about! I could say “toMAYto” and a BCBA could say, “toMAHto,” but we really just want to get along and understand each other! We came together and created a vocabulary list to better understand each other.
Here are some of the common terms we both use and how we really are meaning the same thing!
Some of the common speech terms that overlap with BCBA terminology is listed. The Speech term is first then the ABA term:  Requesting-Manding, Labeling-Tacting, Imitation- Echoic, and Fill in- intra-verbal. Knowing these basic terms will help the SLP and BCBA and ABA therapist to understand each other. We may speak different languages but we are all trying to come together and work as a team to get the same result.
— Hannah Trahan, MS CCC-SLP & Nicole LeMaster, MA BCBA

SLP Term Translation
Label Tact
Request Mand
Imitation Echoic
Fill in Intraverbal Fill in
Open ended question Intraverbals
Non-verbal Non-vocal
Code switch a different means of interacting with people based on your learning history with them. Ex: the way you talk with friends vs. the way you talk with co-workers
Motor planning being able to complete the steps necessary to do an activity. Being able to move your body to get the job done.
Articulation Speech sounds
Executive functioning Problem solving
Therapy of mind Perspective taking
Central coherence ability to focus on details as well as the whole picture
AAC Alternative Augmentative Communication
Fluency smooth, rhythmic, effortless speech
Dysfluency stuttering
Syntax grammar
Semantics word meaning
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May is Better Hearing and Speech Month

May is Better Hearing and Speech Month, a time to raise awareness about communication disorders and the Speech-Language Pathologists and Audiologists who provide treatment.

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A Speech-Language Pathologist (a.k.a. Speech Therapist) is a professional who evaluates and treats children and adults with speech and language delays or disorders. On the hearing side of things, an Audiologist is a person who provides diagnosis and rehabilitation of hearing loss.

I have worked as a pediatric Speech-Language Pathologist (SLP) for nearly 12 years now. I learned a lot in school to help me with my profession, but my real education has come from everyday experiences in working with children and their families. These invaluable experiences have molded me into the therapist I am today. One important topic comes up frequently when talking to parents: most wish they had more knowledge and awareness of speech/language development so they knew sooner that their child’s development was delayed.

The two main areas of communication development are Language and Speech. Language is the rule-based system that we use to communicate, including what words mean, how they can be put together, and how to make new words. It is made up of Expressive Language (what is said) and Receptive Language (what is understood). Speech is the actual verbal communication and includes fluency, voice, and articulation. SLPs also work on Pragmatics, the social use of language, and aural rehabilitation, after children receive hearing aids or cochlear implants. The American Speech-Language Hearing Association (ASHA) has fantastic resources on speech/language development that can be accessed here: http://www.asha.org/public/speech/development/chart/.

There is little information on the incidence of communication disorders and delays in the United States. In the 2005-2006 school year, 1.1 million students were classified in schools as having a “speech and language impairment”. This number is certainly higher to account for children who receive therapy in outpatient clinics, non-public schools, and in the home. Beyond these numbers are the numbers of children diagnosed with Autism. It is now estimated that 1 in 68 children are on the Autism Spectrum. 1 in 68. What this means for SLPs is that our caseloads are being made up more and more of children who have a diagnosis of Autism. Not all children with autism have speech/language challenges, many need help learning to follow directions, take turns talking, greeting others, saying words, signing, and imitating gestures and actions. The list goes on and on. A lack of or delay in communication is often the first sign parents have that something is going on with their child’s development and so it is so important to understand typical development.

All of that is the technical information about what I do. It is very important that parents, families, and the public understand what speech and language is and when to recognize a delay or disorder. But, I can tell you that there is so much more to what we do. This is a job that my fellow SLPS and myself are extremely passionate about. We LOVE helping children learn to communicate! There is nothing more rewarding than the first time a child says a sound, word, or their first sentence. THAT is why we do what we do every day.

Kristin Kouka, MA, CCC-SLP

Speech-Language Pathologist

Kouka Kids Speech Therapy, LLC