Tag Archives: problem behaviors

Tips for grocery shopping with your child with Autism

grocery

Hey parents!  I know grocery shopping with a child on the spectrum can be challenging at times.  Here are a few helpful tips that may help you get your get in and out of the grocery store successfully!

  1. Keep little hands busy from grabbing items outside of the cart by giving your child something to hold onto while in the cart.  It can be a little bag of snacks or a fun toy to play with.

 

  1. Make shopping a game.  Share the list of items with your child.  You can even make a visual list if it will be more helpful for your child to see the pictures of the items you need to find.

 

  1. Set rules and stick to them.  If you don’t follow through with the rules you set, your child will learn your rules don’t need to be followed.

 

  1. Reward good behavior and don’t reward the bad!  If your child is being cooperative, praise your child and deliver other desirable items and activities while you shop.  If your child makes it through the entire shopping trip successfully, reward your child afterwards such as go to the park or get some ice cream.

 

Start with short trips and work up to keep your child successful if shopping trips have a history of being very difficult.  You may need to start with going to the store to purchase only 1 item so that you can get in and out quickly to begin teaching your child how to behave while in the store so that you can get a chance to reward your child for being successful.  Once your child begins to understand how to behave in the store and learns that being cooperative leads to other desirable and fun things, you can gradually begin to increase the number of items on your list and the length of your shopping trip.

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How to get your child to follow directions in 5 easy steps

Mother and daughter playing with ball in the park

Many parents of children with and without disabilities often struggle with getting get their child to listen to them or follow directions. Here are 5 simple steps we’ve compiled  to follow to help teach your child to listen and follow directions.

  1. Get close to your child before you start talking or giving a direction. It is suggested that you are less than 5 feet from your child before giving any directions. If your child can’t hear you or understand you, they can’t follow your directions!
  2. Gain eye contact with your child. This will get their attention and provide a good opening to give a direction. You may need to prompt eye contact by calling their name. For example, “Johnny, look at me” or use physical guidance to move their face toward yours. ALWAYS praise them for looking at you.
  3. Once you are close and have eye contact give a clear and concise direction.  When giving a direction make it a command or statement, do not make it a question. Instead of saying, “Can you get your backpack”, say, “Get your backpack”. At first it might be necessary to use only simple one-step directions in order to avoid confusion.
  4. Praise and reward your child for every direction that is followed and for all attempts to follow directions. If your child attempts to follow the directions but can’t quite get it done, praise them for trying and help them complete it. Praise and rewards should follow immediately. Avoid negative statements like “That’s not what I asked you to do” and “You aren’t listening to me” and ignore mistakes, remember at least they are trying.
  5. ALWAYS follow through. Make sure your child completes what you ask them to do even if physical guidance (i.e., hand over hand) is needed. In order to avoid empty threats or promises, only issue the directions if you are 100% committed to making sure that your child follows through. Don’t allow your child to avoid or escape directions placed upon them, as you want your child to learn that when you give them a direction the expectation is that it will be followed or you will help.

Remember learning should be fun. The more excited you are about it, the more excited your child will be to do it. You can also make a game of learning to follow directions. Hide a quarter (or something the child likes) somewhere in a room. Tell the child that he may have the item if he will listen to your directions and follow them exactly. Remember give the directions only once and if they find the item they get to keep it.

 

– guest blogger, Chrissy Barosky, MA BCBA

Manager of Clinical Development, Bierman ABA Autism Centers 

Planning Ahead: Tips for Increasing Your Child’s Success when Dining out in a Restaurant

We know that sometimes as parents it can be very difficult to take a child with autism to a restaurant with you. You might be worried that people may judge you if your child misbehaves. Below are some tips on how to plan ahead before going out to help keep your child successful and your trip enjoyable!

dining

1.) Find places that are designated as autism friendly; that may not have as many people and are not as brightly lit or as loud.

2.) Keep your child with you at all times, this will make them feel safe knowing that you’re by them.

3.) Set the expectations ahead of time as to where you’re going and what they can or cannot do while you’re there.

4.) Let your child have a say in what you do, you can even show them pictures so they can help decide where you’re going.

5.) Use the bathroom before leaving the house so your child is comfortable.

6.) Bring an item for your child to play with that they enjoy while you wait for your food – this could be an iPad, sensory items, toys or even a snack.

7.) Look at the menu beforehand, make sure there is a food option for your child that they will eat.

8.) Make a reservation or call ahead so you don’t have to wait to be seated upon arrival.

9.) Ask for a seat in a quieter, less crowded section of the restaurant, this can be less over-stimulating for your child.

10.) Don’t be afraid to ask the server for help – if your child needs a lid for their cup, or a snack to come out quickly.

11.) Request the check as soon as your food arrives.  This way, you will not have to wait long after your child is done eating.

12.) When your child behaves desirably reinforce good behavior with a snack or preferred item to play with.  Make good behavior worthwhile so they will want to behave well in the future.

13.) Have your child keep a preferred item with them so they will be less likely to be upset if they cannot have something they want.

Post by Holli Novinger, BCaBA, Manager of our Indianapolis Area Locations