Tag Archives: early intervention autism

You say “toMAYto” and I say “toMAHto”

www.johnbragg.com

May is Better Hearing and Speech Month.  Speech and Language Pathologists like to use this month to educate and teach others more about what we do and how to better ourselves as clinicians.  As an SLP, we work with many therapists OT, PT and BCBAs. Many of us use the same vocabulary and many terms can differ. As an SLP working in a team with BCBAs it is vital to know what we are all talking about! I could say “toMAYto” and a BCBA could say, “toMAHto,” but we really just want to get along and understand each other! We came together and created a vocabulary list to better understand each other.
Here are some of the common terms we both use and how we really are meaning the same thing!
Some of the common speech terms that overlap with BCBA terminology is listed. The Speech term is first then the ABA term:  Requesting-Manding, Labeling-Tacting, Imitation- Echoic, and Fill in- intra-verbal. Knowing these basic terms will help the SLP and BCBA and ABA therapist to understand each other. We may speak different languages but we are all trying to come together and work as a team to get the same result.
— Hannah Trahan, MS CCC-SLP & Nicole LeMaster, MA BCBA

SLP Term Translation
Label Tact
Request Mand
Imitation Echoic
Fill in Intraverbal Fill in
Open ended question Intraverbals
Non-verbal Non-vocal
Code switch a different means of interacting with people based on your learning history with them. Ex: the way you talk with friends vs. the way you talk with co-workers
Motor planning being able to complete the steps necessary to do an activity. Being able to move your body to get the job done.
Articulation Speech sounds
Executive functioning Problem solving
Therapy of mind Perspective taking
Central coherence ability to focus on details as well as the whole picture
AAC Alternative Augmentative Communication
Fluency smooth, rhythmic, effortless speech
Dysfluency stuttering
Syntax grammar
Semantics word meaning
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Why Changing a Child’s Team is a GOOD thing

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Throughout the course of a child’s treatment with any ABA provider, one thing should be a constant: therapist changes happen. Frequently.

And understandably, this tends to be a difficult adjustment for both our kiddos and their families! In order to continuing developing the best team possible, there are occasionally team changes as a result of professional growth and career advancement, however, it’s important to recognize that team changes do not solely occur because staffing dictates; as an ABA provider, our ultimate goal is to ensure that your child receives the absolute best quality treatment, and one element of providing a well-rounded ABA program is therapist change.

Why?

There are a multitude of benefits to changing therapists, however, we’re going to focus on two: generalization of skills and functional relationship building.

Requiring a learner to be able to respond to new therapists is an important, often under-utilized form of teaching generalization. While learning a new skill with a specific therapist is an amazing accomplishment for a child, it is equally important to ensure that skills taught aren’t just generalized across different environments, but across different people as well.  For instance, a child may return a greeting daily to the therapists that have been teaching them this skill for 6 months, but that doesn’t necessarily mean that, if a novel persons says ‘Hi,’ the response they’ve learned with their typical therapist will generalize.

In addition to generalization, building relationships with and responding to novel people regularly will help set up your child for success in the future. In school, work, or other standard day-to-day activities, we are expected to be able to form and cultivate relationships with new people. Whether it’s a new teacher, a new boss, a new neighbor, a new babysitter or family member, being able to and confident in responding to new faces is always beneficial to a child.

In the end, we understand that therapist changes can be a difficult adjustment for everyone involved, but the benefits of regular team changes will only help children to meet their goals.

A quick word on Precision Teaching AKA ‘The Chart’

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Precision teaching & fluency based instruction training…

One topic that I want to expand upon from the clinical priorities list is precision teaching & fluency based instruction training…

We know that in order to make the most meaningful gains with our learners,we need a strong system of measurement in place. Measurement allows us to make decisions about what we are teaching and how we are teaching it. The better the measurement, the better the decisions. The better the decisions, the better the learning. As a team, our primary goal is to maximize the efficiency and effectiveness of our instruction so our children can grow as quickly as possible. Precision Teaching is a method of standardized measurement and visual analysis using “the chart”, and is based on core behavior analytic principles. All locations have received training and are introducing the “chart” into their programs. Over time, we will develop more intense trainings to teach our clinical team how to develop programs and make quick decisions based on data patterns.

Laura Grant

Vice President of Clinical Development

Tips for grocery shopping with your child with Autism

grocery

Hey parents!  I know grocery shopping with a child on the spectrum can be challenging at times.  Here are a few helpful tips that may help you get your get in and out of the grocery store successfully!

  1. Keep little hands busy from grabbing items outside of the cart by giving your child something to hold onto while in the cart.  It can be a little bag of snacks or a fun toy to play with.

 

  1. Make shopping a game.  Share the list of items with your child.  You can even make a visual list if it will be more helpful for your child to see the pictures of the items you need to find.

 

  1. Set rules and stick to them.  If you don’t follow through with the rules you set, your child will learn your rules don’t need to be followed.

 

  1. Reward good behavior and don’t reward the bad!  If your child is being cooperative, praise your child and deliver other desirable items and activities while you shop.  If your child makes it through the entire shopping trip successfully, reward your child afterwards such as go to the park or get some ice cream.

 

Start with short trips and work up to keep your child successful if shopping trips have a history of being very difficult.  You may need to start with going to the store to purchase only 1 item so that you can get in and out quickly to begin teaching your child how to behave while in the store so that you can get a chance to reward your child for being successful.  Once your child begins to understand how to behave in the store and learns that being cooperative leads to other desirable and fun things, you can gradually begin to increase the number of items on your list and the length of your shopping trip.

Brain Development in children with autism: Importance of Early Intervention

In a study, it was suggested an MRI may aid in the early diagnosis of autism, thus stressing the importance of early intervention.

The study found children with autism show a faster development of grey matter in the brain (often in an 18 month span) compared to typical children in which the process often takes many years.  This rapid growth in such a short period of time may be too fast for the brain to handle and cause the brain to fail to make many neural connections.   Because of this, the infant may struggle when interpreting his or her environment and instead withdraw from the world.  Not until growth rate of the brain begins to slow down will the child begin to possibly use the useful neural connections and no longer use the connections that are not.

However, often by this time, the brain’s neural plasticity has already begun to decrease (causing the brain’s neural pathways to harden) making it even more difficult at this point for the brain to form new connections.

autism awareness series on autism treatment

April Autism Awareness month blog series