Tag Archives: autism awareness

Precision teaching & fluency based instruction training

One topic that I want to expand upon from the clinical priorities list is precision teaching & fluency based instruction training…

We know that in order to make the most meaningful gains with our learners,we need a strong system of measurement in place. Measurement allows us to make decisions about what we are teaching and how we are teaching it. The better the measurement, the better the decisions. The better the decisions, the better the learning. As a team, our primary goal is to maximize the efficiency and effectiveness of our instruction so our children can grow as quickly as possible. Precision Teaching is a method of standardized measurement and visual analysis using “the chart”, and is based on core behavior analytic principles. All locations have received training and are introducing the “chart” into their programs. Over time, we will develop more intense trainings to teach our clinical team how to develop programs and make quick decisions based on data patterns.

Laura Grant

Vice President of Clinical Development7722524_orig.png

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Is my ABA provider effective?

Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) therapy for children with autism has been proven to work over a period of time. However, as a parent you may not have the necessary experience or background to determine if the level of expertise of a practitioner is meeting your child’s goals and needs.

Beyond the obvious signs of whether or not your child is making progress, there are some other factors when assessing a provider that you can use to evaluate their potential effectiveness.  Here’s a tool-kit that you can use.

Didactic Children Therapy

How many children are on your BCBA/ BCaBA’s caseload?  Of course, you might also want to check if the individual overseeing your child’s program is credentialed (Board Certified).  The best way to find out is to ask directly.  If that doesn’t work then you can approximate this by comparing the total number of children in the program with the total number of BCBAs/ BCaBAs.  There is no ‘correct’ number of children per BCBA/ BCaBA (it depends on the complexity of each program, the experience of the staff, number of assistants etc).  In our experience a good approximation is no more than 10.  You can also think about it this way – if your BCBA/ BCaBA has, for example, 15 kids, then assuming they spend about 2 hours a week with each child, that adds up to 30 hours (assuming no travel time from one location to another).  Now each child’s care also involves programming time (writing reports, collecting data training with staff etc).  Conservatively allocating around 1 hour per child for programming time totals 15 additional hours for a total of 45 hours. Add in usual administrative time for meetings, emails and other non-clinical weekly activities and very soon you’re above 50 hours/ week.  This is not an effective setting for providing quality of care and leads to compromises and shortcuts.

How many individuals are assigned to your child’s team? An effective model involves more than just the BCBA/ BCaBA overseeing a child’s program – such as such as trainers, program managers (or people assisting BCBA/ BCaBAs etc).  Additional team members should be assisting with some of the tasks mentioned above.

Is your child’s team trained?  How effective a provider’s training program is can have a direct correlation with how good your child’s program will be.  You should inquire about your provider’s training program and methodology to ensure adequate attention is devoted to this.

Is parent training offered?  For a child’s program to be successful – you should be able to ask for and receive training to implement some of the principles at home that are being used with your child everyday.

Is the child actually receiving one on one therapy? – Or are multiple children overseen by a therapist?  For ABA services to be most beneficial – your child should be one on one with a therapist.  Your child’s therapist should not be paired with multiple kids at once.  This is important not only for the quality of care – but also for how billing is done (if services are being accessed through health insurance)

Are you allowed free and open access to your child’s team and to his/ her sessions?  If not, that is a red flag… it is your child, after all and you should be able to observe your child’s sessions.  (Incidentally this is also a good way to check the above points about one on one therapy).

Are you able to interact with your child’s team on a regular basis and develop a good working relationship?  The level of communication and involvement that you have with your child’s team is a good measure of how vested the provider is in your child’s program.

What is the general vibe and environment like at the place of service?  Schedule a visit or request and observation. You can tell a lot by observing and interacting with the team.

Does your child’s staff take proper data and clinical note? You should be able to get a summary of your child’s sessions – either upon request or as a regular part of the process.  This is a good way for you to stay up to speed with your child’s progress.

Creative Children Therapy

Since time is your most valuable resource, especially when your child’s progress is concerned – it is crucial to have a toolkit to assess the effectiveness of your provider. These questions should serve as a starting point for you.

Further reading: http://www.bacb.com/Downloadfiles/ABA_Guidelines_for_ASD.pdf

Autism… Real Awareness

We recently did an information session and were asked a question about “tolerance”… here are some of our thoughts on the topic.

With autism on the rise (now 1 in every 50 children diagnosed) I feel it is important to help educate people about autism.

Autism is a neurological disorder that affects a child’s ability to communicate and interact with others.  Autism is also a spectrum disorder so the symptoms of autism can range from mild to severe.  Because autism affects a child’s ability to communicate effectively, a child may engage in “meltdowns” as a way to communicate with others. Children with autism may sometimes seem “withdrawn” from others or have a difficult time tolerating loud noises.

You may be in a grocery store and see a child crying in the aisle for a toy or eating in a restaurant and see a child covering his ears because the noise is too loud.

If you happen to be somewhere in the community and see something like this, please keep in mind the child is not being “naughty” and his or her parents are NOT bad parents or have poor parenting skills.  The child may, in fact, have autism and struggling to cope with his or her environment.

Having a child with autism can be challenging at times.  However, each child with autism is also incredibly special and unique! Remember, there is nothing “wrong” with a child with autism.  A child with autism is just different….and there is nothing wrong with being different….because being different can actually be a good thing!  So please help support children and families touched by autism and help spread the word about autism awareness!

autism awareness

spreading real autism awareness!